Home Inspections Kill Deals

Four Reasons Why Home Inspections Kill Deals:

buyer inspection for houses

A buyer may cancel a transaction after a home inspection! It may be tempting to blame overzealous a home inspector when a transaction falls apart after the inspection of some houses.

But there’s more to that situation than meets the eye.

Estate professionals know there are many ways that deals can fall apart, from credit, financing, appraisals to plain cold feet. But certainly, one of the more common deal killers is the home inspection.

But it doesn’t have to be!

Houses and Home Inspectors Do Not Kill Deals

Four home inspection situations lead to a cancelled transaction. Two things which are not on this list are the house and the home inspector. Some estate agents blame the home or the home inspector. However, let’s consider what happens in these situations.

Problems are caused when the home inspection report significantly alters the buyer’s expectations about what they thought they were buying. The client may say, “Gee, I thought I was buying a well-maintained home, but now that we have looked closely, I see the house requires a lot more maintenance than we expected”.

Therefore, the cancellation has everything to do with the client’s expectations coming into the inspection! Agents may wish that the home inspector had been less forthcoming about the condition of the house but this is not the solution! The solution to this problem is buyers having more realistic expectations before they sign the contract. My website and blog attempt to teach people skills that will help them look at houses and evaluate risk so they are more prepared to make an offer on the right house.

Here are the top four reasons buyers cancel a deal after the inspection.

1) Unprepared buyers

There are no classes in university or high school to teach people how houses work or where the risk lies in a residential building. Even professional estate agents have little or no training to help them understand how to look at houses and identify issues. A new generation of homebuyers, many of whom who did not grow up working on their houses with their parents, compounds this problem.

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Pipe Leak

Quick Fixes for a Pipe Leak during Lockdown:

Never work on the geyser in your home. Leave geyser repairs to a suitably qualified plumber!

Being prepared to protect your home against a sudden burst pipe can save you thousands of Rands in damage. The following tips will slow or stop pipe leaks long enough to get hold of an emergency plumber.  However, you may have to wait until the lockdown is over.

The first thing you should do is switch off the water supply. You might find this valve where your water supply enters your home or in the valve box on the pavement.

To temporarily stop a pinhole pipe leak on a water pipe, you need to seal the pipe at the leak point. If you have self-tapping screws you may need to widen the hole. Using a small piece of rubber or plastic pipe as a washer screw the self-tapper into the hole.

pipe leaks

If you don’t have one or can’t “borrow” one from appliances in your home! Alternatively, wrap electrical or duct tape around the pipe a few times. In addition, if the pipe leak is on a PVC or galvanised waste pipe, almost any type of tape can be used as a temporary fix.

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About Rental Inspections

rental property inspection

Rental property inspections

If you’re either a tenant or a landlord, you should be familiar with incoming and outgoing rental inspections. They are required by law under the Rental Housing Act.

Landlords and tenants often disagree on who is liable for repairs or damages to a rental property. The best way to avoid conflict is to have a thorough inspection report done. Property inspections help landlords to protect the value of their investment. They provide peace of mind to tenants by ensuring the property is safe for habitation.

However, it’s important that both parties understand what is involved in rental property inspection and the responsibilities of each party.

What is a rental property inspection?

The primary purpose of a rental inspection is to evaluate and record the condition of the property, inside and out. Therefore, I will check the condition of the property, ensuring that services like plumbing and electrics are in working order. The secondary purpose of an inspection is to make sure tenants are keeping to the conditions of their lease.

What does a rental property inspector look for?

I will check the following key areas:

1) The general condition of the property

Upon arrival, I will carry out a quick appraisal of the general condition of the property. Specifically, I will check the condition of the paintwork, both inside and outside. I will the condition of windows, and ensure doors are in good working order and secured properly. In addition, I will check internal and external walls for cracks (which may require further examination).

2) Assess tenant living conditions

Furthermore, I will also assess the tenants living conditions. The state a tenant lives in is an indication as to their ability to look after the property. Generally, landlords want tenants who keep the place tidy, since tidy tenants are more likely to look after the property. While tenants aren’t evicted because they are untidy, landlords may not want to renew the rental agreement for such tenants.

3) Check for illegal activity

I do not search through the tenant’s personal belongings. However, I will check to make sure no illegal activity is being carried out without interfering with the tenants right to privacy.

4) Damp patches and mould

Tenants seldom mention the presence of mould because they are not aware of how serious and dangerous it can be. If mould is present, I will try to establish the cause of the mould or damp.

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Why you should have your home Move-In Certified!

move-in certified

Wise sellers have their property Move In Certified!

You will probably be selling your house with the “Voetstoots Clause” in the Offer to Purchase. But, if you think you are fully protected against any comebacks for latent defects you are wrong!

Under the law, you have a duty to disclose the defects on the property that you are aware of. Your agent may also point out defects that need to be corrected.

If you don’t disclose those defects you may be liable to pay for the correction of the defects after the property has been sold.

As a home seller, you should have your home “Move-in Certified”! Move-in certified homes sell better, faster and for higher prices!

Besides being a great marketing tool, the seller’s home inspection report is also the “Seller’s Disclosure”. This safeguards you against any later legal action that the buyer may want to bring against you for both latent and patent defects!

Do the wise thing, have your home inspected before you sell it!

CONTACT ME

Inspected Once, Inspected Right!®

SEE WHERE I INSPECT IN GAUTENG!

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Critical Home Inspection

About Critical Home Inspections

Critical inspection
You should have a home inspection! If you don’t this may happen to you!

A Critical Home Inspection and report include the really important parts of the home! It is a “Safe Home” inspection.

With a Critical Inspection, I focus and report on the critical components of a home which are the roof, structure (inside and outside), windows and doors, and electricity and plumbing installations.

This inspection is an ideal inspection for both home buyers and sellers! The inspection is for those clients who do not require the full Buyers or Sellers Home Inspection.

Therefore, a Critical Inspection is ideal if you only require inspection of the major components of the home. Besides, a Critical Home Inspection is more affordable!  My fee for a Critical Home Inspection report is about ¾ of that for the Home Buyers or Sellers Inspection.

A Critical Inspection includes

A Critical Inspection includes issues which are frequently NOT plainly obvious to any observant layman.

These include structural cracks in walls, ceilings and floors. Issues such as all damp, roof leaks, illegal or unsafe geysers, windows and door issues. However, I only inspect the internal wall, floor and ceiling finish for signs of damp or staining from moisture intrusion.

Unsafe electrical and gas installations are also part of the inspection. This means stoves and other built-in appliances are included in your report. In addition, I also report surface drainage, vegetation and foliage issues which may affect the structure and roof adversely.

A Critical Inspection includes unsafe, functional or structural issues which, in my opinion, requires prompt remedial attention. Furthermore, remedial action is required to preserve the safety, functional or structural integrity of the home or major installation.

It does not include

Other external elements such as boundary and yard walls, the site, swimming pools, driveways, wall, ceiling and floor finishes, walkways, garden sheds etc. do not form part of the critical inspection. I only inspect BIC’s, sink and kitchen cupboards and counters for moisture intrusion.

CONTACT ME

Inspected Once, Inspected Right!®

SEE WHERE I INSPECT IN GAUTENG!

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