About Rental Inspections

rental property inspection

Rental property inspections

If you’re either a tenant or a landlord, you should be familiar with incoming and outgoing rental inspections. They are required by law under the Rental Housing Act.

Landlords and tenants often disagree on who is liable for repairs or damages to a rental property. The best way to avoid conflict is to have a thorough inspection report done. Property inspections help landlords to protect the value of their investment. They provide peace of mind to tenants by ensuring the property is safe for habitation.

However, it’s important that both parties understand what is involved in rental property inspection and the responsibilities of each party.

What is a rental property inspection?

The primary purpose of a rental inspection is to evaluate and record the condition of the property, inside and out. Therefore, I will check the condition of the property, ensuring that services like plumbing and electrics are in working order. The secondary purpose of an inspection is to make sure tenants are keeping to the conditions of their lease.

What does a rental property inspector look for?

I will check the following key areas:

1) The general condition of the property

Upon arrival, I will carry out a quick appraisal of the general condition of the property. Specifically, I will check the condition of the paintwork, both inside and outside. I will the condition of windows, and ensure doors are in good working order and secured properly. In addition, I will check internal and external walls for cracks (which may require further examination).

2) Assess tenant living conditions

Furthermore, I will also assess the tenants living conditions. The state a tenant lives in is an indication as to their ability to look after the property. Generally, landlords want tenants who keep the place tidy, since tidy tenants are more likely to look after the property. While tenants aren’t evicted because they are untidy, landlords may not want to renew the rental agreement for such tenants.

3) Check for illegal activity

I do not search through the tenant’s personal belongings. However, I will check to make sure no illegal activity is being carried out without interfering with the tenants right to privacy.

4) Damp patches and mould

Tenants seldom mention the presence of mould because they are not aware of how serious and dangerous it can be. If mould is present, I will try to establish the cause of the mould or damp.

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Renting Out a Home

renting

6 Major Things to Know Before Renting Out a Home

By Kay Pascale

With the rising rate of short-term and long-term rentals, there’s a lack of knowledge when it comes to what exactly needs to be done. Different scenarios for renting out your home could yield different challenges. Overall, if you’re deciding to rent out a home to others, there are some basics you should know before you market the home to find a tenant.

1. Pay Attention to Your Home’s Exterior

If you don’t think the exterior of your home matters, think again. Houses are instantly judged just by how the outside looks. If a home looks clean and manicured from the outside, potential renters will remember it and have a more positive outlook before seeing the inside. Although keeping up your curb appeal may be demanding for you and your wallet, you can follow some simple tips to manage the toll nature may take on your home and achieve a beautiful look.

2. Understand Indoor Mechanics

The inside of your home goes a bit beyond just looking nice. You need to be prepared for questions about appliances, recent updates, home improvement projects, and how well the working parts are doing within the home. Specifically, air quality can be a huge question among potential renters. Become educated on indoor air quality and other mechanics of your home so that future tenants can feel safe inside.

Before renting out a house, know that there are some legal actions that need to be addressed if you’re becoming a landlord. Things like insurance and the Rental Housing Amendment Act are good places to start. There are also specific taxes that need to be considered and extra taxation claims to your personal account. Seeing a professional may be a good way to make sure your legal odds and ends are covered.

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